Lecture Series

lecture_series

Elmont Online presents a collection of thought-provoking audio and video presentations by contemporary thinkers, intellectuals, and thought leaders from around the world.  Critical thinking and lively debate are the cornerstones of Elmont Online's mission and motto - Building A Better Community.

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The next time you hear the phrase “I’ve made up my mind” or “This is my decision” or “I am an independent thinker”, you know those phrases that sing the praises of the individual’s independence remember the name Edward Bernays. Bernays practiced the art the “invisible hand”. In the on going Lecture Series here on Elmont Online we are striving to highten our readers awareness and stimulate discussion. This Documentary will cause you to pause, and we would like you to ask yourself why did I chose to …

This is a six part presentation.  You can advance or go back through the clips by clicking the next or previous track buttons (|< or >|) at the bottom of the video.

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Guns, Germs and Steel, the third lecture in our online series, is part of our lecture series.  The one hour program is the third in a three part series that explores Jared Diamond's answer to the question "Why you white people got so much cargo, and we have so little?"

This episode is titled Tropics.  There are two preceding episodes Out of Eden and Conquest.

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The single story, as it relates to a world view, has proved to be a powerful factor in cementing many of the stereotypes and behaviors that we are familiar with.  All of us have been exposed to single stories that leads our own perceptions and expectations.  This concept is a device utilized to force a one-sided view point upon an impressionable mind.  It could be that the intended message is delivered through a simple Christmas card, a local paper or the story books we read as children.

Nigerian Novelist, Chimamanda Adichie, tells us the dangers of the single story in her talk hosted by TED Conferences, LLC. and rebroadcasted above by Elmont.org.  After watching, tell us some of your single stories.  How has the single story affected your community?  How has the single story affected you?

2000_0521_Arundhati_Roy_1296-1-2Arundhati Roy (born November 24, 1961) is an Indian novelist, activist and a world citizen. She won the Booker Prize in 1997 for her first novel The God of Small Things.

Roy was born in Shillong, Meghalaya to a Keralite Syrian Christian mother and a Bengali Hindu father, a tea planter by profession. She spent her childhood in Aymanam, in Kerala, schooling in Corpus Christi. She left Kerala for Delhi at age 16, and embarked on a homeless lifestyle, staying in a small hut with a tin roof within the walls of Delhi's Feroz Shah Kotla and making a living selling empty bottles. She then proceeded to study architecture at the Delhi School of Architecture, . . .

The following is an interview with David Barsiamian. The interview was conducted before a live audience in Seattle WA in 2004.  Elmont Online is proud to feature this interview as it's frist in a series of online lectures over the next 12 months.  By way of introduction, we have excerpted the 'turkey pardoning' allegory for your reading.  It is hoped that you participate by sending us your thoughts on this selection and suggestions for future presentaions.  Tell a friend, form a group, invite a guest, lets get Elmont talking constructively.

"The tradition of 'turkey pardoning' in the U.S. is a wonderful allegory for New Racism. Every year since 1947, the National Turkey Federation presents the U.S. President with a turkey for Thanksgiving. Every year, in a show of ceremonial magnanimity, the President spares that particular bird (and eats another one). After receiving the presidential pardon, the Chosen One is sent to Frying Pan Park in Virginia to live out its natural life. The rest of the 50 million turkeys raised for Thanksgiving are slaughtered and eaten on Thanksgiving Day. ConAgra Foods, the company that has won the Presidential Turkey contract, says it trains the lucky birds to be sociable, to interact with dignitaries, school children and the press. (Soon they'll even speak English!)

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